Introduction to OOAD using UML

Introduction to OOAD using UML

A good understanding of object-oriented analysis and design is important in designing effective systems using modern software engineering languages and frameworks such as C++, .NET and Java™. This five-day course teaches you how to use object-oriented techniques to analyze real-world requirements and to design solutions that are ready to code. The course employs Unified Modeling Language, using UML 2.0 notation.

 

UML TRAINING OBJECTIVES

  • Learn how to identify and design objects, classes, and their relationships to each other
  • Use links, associations, and inheritance
  • Use diagram notation for use cases, class and object representation, links and associations, and object messages
  • Gain a working knowledge UML 2.0
  • Apply knowledge of OOAD to design an object-oriented system which can be implemented in an object-oriented language

UML TRAINING PREREQUISITES

All attendees should have prior programming experience. No prior object-oriented development experience is presumed.

UML TRAINING MATERIALS

All OOAD training students receive a copy of O’Reilly’s Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design: A Brain Friendly Guide to OOAD and Addison-Wesley’s UML Distilled: A Brief Guide to the Standard Object Modeling Language, as w

SOFTWARE NEEDED FOR EACH PC:

For classes delivered online, all participants need either dual monitors or a separate device logged into the online session so that they can do their work on one screen and watch the instructor on the other. A separate computer connected to a projector or large screen TV would be another way for students to see the instructor’s screen simultaneously with working on their own.

UML TRAINING OUTLINE

  • Introduction to Analysis and Design
    • Why is Programming Hard?
    • The Tasks of Software Development
    • Modules
    • Models
    • Modeling
    • Perspective
    • Objects
    • Change
    • New Paradigms
  • Objects
    • Encapsulation
    • Abstraction
    • Objects
    • Classes
    • Responsibilities
    • Attributes
    • Composite Classes
    • Operations and Methods
    • Visibility
    • Inheritance
    • Inheritance Example
    • Protected and Package Visibility
    • Scope
    • Class Scope
  • Advanced Objects
    • Constructors & Destructors
    • Instance Creation
    • Abstract Classes
    • Polymorphism
    • Polymorphism Example
    • Multiple Inheritance
    • Solving Multiple Inheritance Problems
    • Interfaces
    • Interfaces with Ball and Socket Notation
    • Templates
  • Classes and Their Relationships
    • Class Models
    • Associations
    • Multiplicity
    • Qualified Associations
    • Roles
    • Association Classes
    • Composition and Aggregation
    • Using Class Models
  • Sequence Diagrams
    • Sequence Diagrams
    • Interaction Frames
    • Decisions
    • Loops
    • Creating and Destroying Objects
    • Activation – 2.0
    • Synchronous & Asynchronous
    • The Objects Drive the Interactions
    • Evaluating Sequence Diagrams
    • Using Sequence Diagrams
  • Communication Diagrams
    • Communication Diagrams
    • Communication and Class Diagrams
    • Evaluating Communication Diagrams
    • Using Communication Diagrams
  • State Machine Diagrams
    • What is State?
    • State Notation
    • Transitions and Guards
    • Registers and Actions
    • More Actions
    • Internal Transitions
    • Superstates and Substates
    • Concurrent States
    • Using State Machines
    • Implementation
  • Activity Diagrams
    • Activity Notation
    • Decisions and Merges
    • Synchronization
    • Drilling Down
    • Iteration
    • Partitions
    • Parameters and Pins
    • Expansion Regions
    • Using Activity Diagrams
  • Package, Component, and Deployment Diagrams
    • Modeling Groups of Elements – Package Diagrams
    • Visibility and Importing
    • Structural Diagrams
    • Components and Interfaces
    • Deployment Diagram
  • New Models in UML 2.0
    • New to UML 2.0
    • Composite Structure Diagrams
    • Timing Diagrams
    • Interaction Overview Diagrams
  • Use Cases
    • Use Cases
    • Use Case Diagram Components
    • Use Case Diagram
    • Actor Generalization
    • Include and Extend
    • Other Systems
    • Narrative
    • Template for Use Case Narrative
    • Using Use Cases
  • Process
    • Process
    • Risk Management
    • Test
    • Reviews
    • Refactoring
    • History
    • The Unified Process
    • Agile Processes
  • The Project
    • Inception
    • Elaboration
    • Elaboration II
    • Construction Iterations
    • Construction Iterations – The Other Stuff
  • Domain Analysis
    • Top View – The Domain Perspective
    • Data Dictionary
    • Finding the Objects
    • Responsibilities, Collaborators, and Attributes
    • CRC Cards
    • Class Models
    • Use Case Models
    • Other Models
    • Judging the Domain Model
  • Requirements and Specification
    • The Goals
    • Understand the Problem
    • Specify a Solution
    • Prototyping
    • The Complex User
    • Other Models
    • Judging the Requirements Model
  • Design of Objects
    • Design
    • Factoring
    • Design of Software Objects
    • Features
    • Methods
    • Cohesion of Objects
    • Coupling between Objects
    • Coupling and Visibility
    • Inheritance
  • System Design
    • Design
    • A Few Rules
    • Object Creation
    • Class Models
    • Interaction Diagrams
    • Printing the Catalog
    • Printing the Catalog II
    • Printing the Catalog III
    • Object Links
    • Associations
  • Refactoring
    • Refactoring
    • Clues and Cues
    • How to Refactor
    • A Few Refactoring Patterns
  • Conclusion

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Introduction to OOAD using UML

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  • Course No : JAV-202
  •  Theory : 40%
  •  Lab : 60%
  • Duration : 30 hours
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